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Wednesday, September 18, 2013
A*STAR Scientists Find a Promising Way To Boost The Body’s Immune Surveillance Via p53, “The Genome Guardian” In The Fight Against Cancer

1.            Researchers at A*STAR’s Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN) have discovered a new mechanism involving p53, the famous tumour suppressor, to fight against aggressive cancers. This strategy works by sabotaging the ability of the cancer cells to hide from the immune system. Published in the prestigious Nature Communications journal, this research opens a new avenue to improve targeted cancer therapy by harnessing the body’s own immune system to control and eliminate cancer cells.

2.            Also known as the “Guardian of the Genome”, p53 fights cancer by causing damaged cells to die or by halting the growth of mutant cells before they become cancerous and spread to the rest of the body. Ironically, because of its pivotal role in coordinating a range of cancer-fighting mechanisms in the human body, it is also one of the most important cancer-causing genes when mutated. Studies have shown that more than 50% of all human cancers carry defects in the p53 gene, and almost all other cancers with a normal p53 function carry other defects which indirectly impair the cancer-fighting function of p53.

3.            In this study, the SIgN team discovered for the first time that the integrity of p53 affects the production of a special cell surface protein called Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I. MHC class I molecules on the cancer cell surface serve as targets for the immune system. Therefore, having less MHC I molecules may allow cancer cells to hide better and escape detection by the immune system.

4.            Using two cancer cell lines differing only in the integrity of p53 gene, the scientists observed that cancer cells with defective p53 had much less MHC class I on the cell surface. Specifically, they discovered that p53 moderates the expression of MHC I by controlling the amount of another protein called ERAP1 in the cells. Interestingly, a number of disease conditions including tumour malignancy, multiple sclerosis and autoimmune disease were recently reported to be associated with ERAP1.

5.            The team leader, Associate Professor Ren Ee Chee from SIgN said, “We were surprised to discover that p53 regulates MHC class I production by acting through ERAP1. This may explain how cancer cells escape detection by our body’s immune system. More importantly, it opens up exciting avenues of research to explore how restoration of p53 with drugs such as those that target ERAP1 can help to harness the immune system to recognise and destroy cancer cells.”

6.           Acting Executive Director of SIgN, Associate Professor Laurent Rénia said, “The team has uncovered a new door to manipulate one of the most studied yet enigmatic cancer-associated genes of our times. I am confident that this work will pave the way for more targeted, efficient and cost-effective treatment for the millions of cancer patients globally.”



p53 also plays a role in virus infection by increasing MHC I. This is a microscope image of lung cancer cells infected
with H1N1 influenza virus. Upon H1N1 viral infection, the cells showed an increase in MHC class I (green) and p53 (red) expression. The co-expression of increased MHC class I and p53 is in yellow. This demonstrates that p53àERAP1àMHC I pathway also occurs in viral infection. It may be interesting to explore the role of p53 in viral infection.

 

 

Notes for editor:

 

The research findings described in this media release can be found in the 22 August online issue of Nature Communications under the title, "p53 increases MHC class I expression by upregulating the endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase ERAP1" by Bei Wang1, Dandan Niu1, Liyun Lai1 & Ee Chee Ren1,2*

1Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), 8A Biomedical Grove, Singapore 138648, Singapore.

2Department of Microbiology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597, Singapore

*Corresponding Author (Email: ren_ee_chee@immunol.a-star.edu.sg)

 

 

Full text of the article can be accessed from http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2013/130822/ncomms3359/full/ncomms3359.html

AGENCY FOR SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND RESEARCH (A*STAR)

 

For media queries and clarifications, please contact:

Dr. Sarah Chang

Corporate Communications

Agency for Science, Technology and Research

Tel: (65) 6826 6442

About the Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN)

The Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN), officially inaugurated on 15 January 2008, is a research consortium under the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR)’s Biomedical Research Council. The mandate of SIgN is to advance human immunology research and participate in international efforts to combat major health problems. Since its launch, SIgN has grown rapidly and currently includes 250 scientists from 26 different countries around the world working under 28 renowned principal investigators. At SIgN, researchers investigate immunity during infection and various inflammatory conditions including cancer and are supported by cutting edge technological research platforms and core services.

Through this, SIgN aims to build a strong platform in basic human immunology research for better translation of research findings into clinical applications. SIgN also sets out to establish productive links with local and international institutions, and encourage the exchange of ideas and expertise between academic, industrial and clinical partners and thus contribute to a vibrant research environment in Singapore.

For more information about SIgN, please visit www.sign.a-star.edu.sg.

 

About the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR)

The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) is Singapore's lead public sector agency that fosters world-class scientific research and talent to drive economic growth and transform Singapore into a vibrant knowledge-based and innovation driven economy.

In line with its mission-oriented mandate, A*STAR spearheads research and development in fields that are essential to growing Singapore’s manufacturing sector and catalysing new growth industries. A*STAR supports these economic clusters by providing intellectual, human and industrial capital to its partners in industry.

A*STAR oversees 20 biomedical sciences and physical sciences and engineering research entities, located in Biopolis and Fusionopolis as well as their vicinity. These two R&D hubs, house a bustling and diverse community of local and international research scientists and engineers from A*STAR’s research entities as well as a growing number of corporate laboratories.

Please visit www.a-star.edu.sg

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