News

2020

AQP5 ENRICHES FOR STEM CELLS AND CANCER ORIGINS IN THE DISTAL STOMACH - NATURE I 07 FEB 2020.

While Lgr5-expressing stem cells are known to fuel epithelial renewal in the pyloric stomach, whether they are origins of gastric cancer and the identity of human pyloric stemcells are unknown. By comparing transcriptomes of stem and differentiated populations along the gastrointestinal tract followed by validation with a suite of novel mouse models, Aquaporin-5 (Aqp5) was identified as a unique marker of the pyloric stem cell.When clinically relevant signalling pathways were genetically perturbed in Aqp5-expressing cells, these pyloric stem cells acted as the source of invasive gastric cancer, the third deadliest cancer worldwide. Importantly, AQP5-expressing cells from human stomachswere established as stem cells and can now be isolated for further studies. The findings of this study pave the way for new therapeutic opportunities in regenerative medicine and gastric cancer.

Featured in:

English language:
Image of the Day: Stomach Stem Cells, The Scientist, 13 Feb
Singapore discovers cancer origins in stomach, Bio Spectrum Asia, 11 Feb
Human Stem Cells And Cancer Origins Discovered In The Stomach For The First Time, Medicine Health, 10 Feb
Human Stem Cells And Cancer Origins Discovered In The Stomach For The First Time, Bio Space, 6 Feb

Chinese language:
AQP5 reveals gastric stem cells and origin of gastric cancer, Science Net.cn, 10 Feb
Nature: AQP5 enriches for stem cells and cancer origins in the distal stomach, Nanoer, 10 Feb

Japanese language:
AQP5 reveals gastric stem cells and origin of gastric cancer, QLife Jp, 12 Feb
Kanazawa University Identifies Human Stem Cells And Cancer Origins In The Stomach, University Journal, 10 Feb 
Singapore discovers cancer origins in stomach, Hokkoku Shimbun, 8 Feb

Korean language:
World’s first discovery of human stomach stem cells and origins of gastric cancer, Bosa Korea, 12 Feb

SINGAPORE SCIENTISTS REVEAL ADVANCES IN LIVER CANCER TREATMENT | 8 JAN 2020.

Researchers at A*STAR’s Singapore Bioimaging Consortium (SBIC) have identified a metabolic pathway as a new target in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the predominant form of liver cancer. Their study showed that two metabolic enzymes in the proline metabolic pathway PYCR1 and ALDH18A1 are potential targets to inhibit cancer cell growth, and offers new hope for effective liver cancer treatments.
The research study was a collaboration between SBIC, the Institute of Medical Biology (IMB), the National Cancer Center Singapore (NCCS), and the Pharmaceuticals Division of Bayer. Its findings were published in the Journal of Hepatology in November 2019.

SINGAPORE SCIENTISTS REVEAL A METABOLIC PATHWAY AS A NEW TARGET IN LIVER CANCER TREATMENT | 7 JAN 2020.

Researchers at A*STAR’s Singapore Bioimaging Consortium (SBIC) have identified a metabolic pathway as a new target in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the predominant form of liver cancer. Their study showed that two metabolic enzymes in the proline metabolic pathway PYCR1 and ALDH18A1 are potential targets to inhibit cancer cell growth, and offers new hope for effective liver cancer treatments.
The research study was a collaboration between SBIC, the Institute of Medical Biology (IMB), the National Cancer Center Singapore (NCCS), and the Pharmaceuticals Division of Bayer. Its findings were published in the Journal of Hepatology in November 2019.

2019

ROADMAP OF PANCREATIC DEVELOPMENT IN HUMANS| 10 JUL 2019.

Professor Ray Dunn’s team from A*STAR’s Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) has developed a roadmap of pancreatic development in humans. Led by Dr Ray Dunn, the team studied human induced pluripotent stem cells from GATA6-heterozygous individuals and a human embryonic stem cell line in which they introduced a range of different GATA6 mutations. They then evaluated the ability of the various stem cells to generate definitive endoderm (DE), from which the pancreas and other organs in the gastrointestinal tract emerge, using markers unique to different stages of DE differentiation. The news was reported in Science & Technology Research News.

THE COST OF CHRONIC WOUNDS | 6 JUL 2019.

In an article on pressure injuries, Professor Zee Upton, lead of the skin integrity, repair and regeneration theme at A*STAR’s Skin Research Institute of Singapore (SRIS) and Executive Director of IMB, said that chronic wounds are a “hidden” health issue that warrant urgent attention. A third of diabetes costs go towards treating non-healing foot ulcers, and a major amputation due to a non-healing diabetic wound has a higher five-year mortality rate than breast, prostate or colon cancers. Prof Upton said that chronic wounds affect about 150,000 Singaporeans annually - a number that is set to increase given Singapore’s ageing population. The news was reported in TODAY Online.

PROTEIN PARTNERS OF RECEPTOR INTERACTING PROTEIN-2 (RIP2 | 5 JUL 2019.

Professor Bruno Reversade’s team from A*STAR’s Institute of Medical Biology (IMB), the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have identified the protein partners of receptor interacting protein-2 (RIP2). They found that for RIP2 to be activated, it must first bind to another protein called the nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain protein (NOD), which comes in two forms (NOD1/2) and is responsible for upstream detection of bacteria. The news was reported in Science &Technology Research News.

PHYSICAL CONNECTIONS BETWEEN FIVE OF THE CHROMOSOMES IN THE HUMAN KARYOTYPE| 3,5,8 JUL 2019.

Scientists from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research, the Institute of Medical Biology, A*STAR and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have probed physical connections between five of the chromosomes in the human karyotype in a report recently published online in the Journal of Cell Biology. The team proposed that the structural basis of rDNA connections between chromosomes is topological interlockings, or catenations. The research findings could provide clues about the origins of the chromosomal fusions that lead to Robertsonian translocations, the most common chromosomal abnormality in humans. The news was reported in several online scientific publications, including Phys Org, Science Daily and Nature World News.

NATIONAL WOUND INFORMATION DATABASE| 13 APR 2019.

Three regional healthcare systems - National University Health System, SingHealth, and National Healthcare Group - will set up a national wound information database. The database is part of efforts under the Wound Care in the Tropics Programme led by Professor Zee Upton, Director of A*STAR's Institute of Medical Biology and Research Director at Skin Research Institute of Singapore. She said the information collected in the database will help researchers understand the severity of chronic wounds and the money and resources it consumes. Resources can then be better allocated and effective treatment plans can be set up in Singapore’s medical system. Professor Upton was interviewed at St Luke Hospital’s Wound Conference and the news was reported in chinese language media: Lianhe Zaobao, Shinmin Daily, and Lianhe Zaobao Online.

BONE GROWTH PROTEINS AND SUGAR ANALOGUES OF THE TISSUE COMPONENTS COULD LEAD TO NEW BONE REPAIR METHODS| 19 MAR 2019.

A team of researchers led by Dr Simon Cool from A*STAR's Institute of Medical Biology has successfully helped to initiate stem cell-driven repair cascades throughout the body by replacing or replenishing injured tissue with biomimetic structures. Insights from the study of the interactions between bone growth proteins and sugar analogues of the tissue components could lead to new bone repair methods. As heparan sulfate can be readily attached to various biodegradable polymers used in orthopaedic surgery, his team is now fabricating bone implant materials with enhanced growth factor binding performance. These materials will be evaluated in various bone tissue repair models before plans for commercialisation. The news was reported in Medical Xpress and Science & Technology Research News.

HARSH TREATMENTS THAT FAIL TO ELIMINATE TUMOURS CAN MAKE THEM MORE RESILIENT|27 FEB 2019.

A team of A*STAR researchers, led by Dr Giulia Rancati from Institute of Medical Biology and other members from Genome Institute of Singapore and Singapore Immunology Network found that harsh treatments that fail to eliminate tumours can make them more resilient. This finding offers a warning about anti-cancer treatments that eliminate tumours by applying maximal therapeutic pressure. The news was reported in Medical Xpress and Science and Technology Research News.

2018

A DEEPER UNDERSTANDING OF CHROMOSOME CAPPING COULD IMPROVE THERAPIES FOR BOTH CANCER AND AGING| 20 DEC 2018.

Scientists from A*STAR’s Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) have found that switching off the enzyme that adds protective caps to chromosome ends could help fight many types of cancer. The team demonstrated the treatment's potential by using it to thwart tumor growth in mice. The team found that a master regulator of development, HOXC5, and the microRNA mir-615-3p, which is nested inside the HOXC5 gene, act together to suppress telomerase through these distant switches. Further study showed that the switches are present in many long-lived mammals, including humans and chimpanzees, but not in short-lived mammals, like mice and rats, as an extra barrier against the increased tumor risk that accompanies a longer lifespan. The news was reported in Medical Xpress.

SINGAPOREAN SCIENTISTS DEVELOP DEVICE WHICH CAN REPLACE ANIMAL-TESTING | 12 DEC 2018.

Researchers from A*STAR’s Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology (SIMTech) and Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) have successfully reconstructed human skin on a compact device which may reduce or eventually replace animal testing. The device, dubbed the skin-on-a-chip, works based on microfluidics, can process small quantities of fluids at a microscale. This makes the device even more capable of mimicking the structure functionalities and microenvironment of human skin compared to static skin cultures. According to the researchers, this allows the testing of skin care products for absorption, safety, and permeability. The news was reported in Cosmetic Design Asia.
Researchers from A*STAR’s Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology (SIMTech) and Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) have successfully reconstructed human skin on a compact device which may reduce or eventually replace animal testing. The device allows for topical skincare and medicinal products to be tested and may help to replace the millions of animals, such as mice and rabbits, that the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals says are widely used in the pharmaceutical, toxicology and cosmetic industries.
Dr Wang Zhiping, principal scientist at SIMTech and lead researcher, said skin cells grown on the device are close to the real thing. The human skin cultures are grown in a microfluidic device. This system, Dr Wang says, allows the device to process small quantities of fluid on a micro-scale, which imitates the way real skin cells behave when they come into contact with products. The project won a Global 3Rs Award by an international non-profit group that promotes the humane treatment of animals in science. The news was reported in The Straits Times (Science, A32).

PSLE DOES NOT IRREVERSIBLY DEFINE CHILD'S WORTH| 24 NOV 2018.

The public has expressed positive sentiments over publicity surrounding Dr Vincent Lim’s story of becoming an A*STAR scientist armed with a PhD, despite scoring 124 for PSLE. Many have commented that Dr Lim’s narrative is a timely reminder that PSLE scores and early academic failure do not irreversibly define a child’s future, as some children may be late bloomers, and may excel later in life just like Dr Lim. The news was reported in The Straits Times (Forum, B09).

FROM EM3 TO PHD: A*STAR RESEARCHER SCORED 124 FOR PSLE |19 NOV 2018.

Dr Vincent Lim, a research fellow at A*STAR's Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) was an EM3 pupil who scored 124 in the Primary School Leaving Examination (PSLE). Although he only made it to the Normal (Academic) stream in secondary school, he started to shine as a polytechnic student and later graduated with first class honours from Nanyang Technological University (NTU), where he read biology. Unsurprisingly, he is an advocate for not giving up on weaker students. Dr Lim believes weaker students tend to have lower self-esteem, which means they care a lot about what others think of them. He added that everyone is fighting a battle which cannot be seen so we should always be kind. To students who are struggling academically, he said, “Despite the situation you are in, there are always ways to go on. Don’t give up on yourself, and you will find a way”. The news was reported in The Straits Times (Home, B020).

A*STAR SCIENTISTS ACHIEVE BREAKTHROUGH IN GROWING SKIN THAT HELPS REDUCE ANIMAL TESTING |8 NOV 2018.

Scientists from A*STAR’s Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology (SIMTech) and Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) have successfully reconstructed human skin on a credit-card sized device that could help to reduce or eventually replace animal testing in the pharmaceutical, toxicological, and cosmetic industries. For their significant innovation in developing this “skin-on-a-chip” solution, the team scored a Global 3Rs Award by Innovation & Quality (IQ) Consortium and the non-profit organisation, AAALAC International for advancing the Refinement, Replacement or Reduction of animal use in scientific research. The news was reported in The Independent Sg.

A*STAR: EVOLVED FUNGAL PATHOGEN MAY HELP RAISE IMMUNITY | 5 NOV 2018.

Scientists from A*STAR’s Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN) and the Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) say they may have discovered a unique way to help protect us against infections by using evolved fungal pathogens. The research team led by SIgN’s principal investigator, Norman Pavelka, found that the immune system of an animal subject was boosted when an evolved version of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans was introduced into its gut. The results of the study were published in Science and a series of patents have been filed for the method of evolving microbes within the gut of animals. The news was reported in Channel 8 Online, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Capital 95.8.

S’POREAN RESEARCHER AT A*STAR WITH A PHD SCORED 124 FOR PSLE, WAS FROM EM3 STREAM | 24 SEP 2018.

Dr. Vincent Lim, a research fellow at A*STAR’s Institute of Medical Biology (IMB), conducting research on helping people with atopic dermatitis, or commonly known as eczema. In the interview published on A*STAR, he shared that he was in the EM3 stream, but was thankful to have a very supportive form teacher who treated her students like her kids. With a good support system, he proceeded with a belief that he was no different from his “smarter peers”. The news was reported in Mothership Sg.

$34M FOR TOMORROW’S COMPUTERS AND OTHER RESEARCH | 13 SEP 2018.

Priority next-generation computers that use superconductor technology to make a quantum leap in operating speed and data storage came a step closer today after a Victoria University of Wellington research team received nearly $6 million as part of funding announced by Research, Science and Innovation Minister the Hon Dr Megan Woods. The researchers, led by Associate Professor Ben Ruck in the School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, are one of 11 Victoria University of Wellington-led teams to receive more than $34 million from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) Endeavour Fund, New Zealand’s largest contestable research fund. The University has more projects funded than any of the 20-plus other institutions to receive money in the announcement and its projects represent a sixth of the total supported. Most research teams involve external collaborators, including other New Zealand universities and such international and national partners as the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the United States, A*STAR’s Institute of Medical Biology (IMB), Singapore, Australian National University, Osaka University in Japan and DNA technology company ZyGEM. The news was reported in Voxy.co.nz.

ASSAY COMBINES MICROFLUIDICS AND NEXT-GENERATION SEQUENCING TO REVEAL MORE MUTATIONS THAN EXISTING TESTS | 30 AUG 2018.

Researchers from A*STAR’s Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) have developed a new diagnostic test which is helping researchers around the world identify gene mutations that put people at risk of severe eczema and other chronic skin diseases. The team created a more globally applicable test that combines microfluidics and next-generation sequencing technologies to decode the entire span of the FLG gene, the skin's outer layer forms a protective barrier against the external environment. As a proof of concept, they used the assay on blood samples from a large cohort of Singaporean patients of Chinese, Malay and Indian descent. The team identified 51 different disease-causing mutations, most of which would be missed by existing screening methods. The news was reported in Medical Xpress.

RECONSTRUCTING SKIN ON A CHIP |16 & 17 AUG 2018.

Researchers from A*STAR’s Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology (SIMTech) and Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) have produced a scalable credit-card sized device that simultaneously facilitates skin cell culture and testing. The team developed a method to grow skin on a matrix using the protein fibrin, preventing skin contraction. The skin is grown directly in the microfluidic device where the tests are conducted, without further manipulation or transfer. The news was reported in Info Surhoy, iConnect007, Brink Wire, Nanowerk, Phys Org.

SINGAPORE AND SOUTH KOREA TO TACKLE SKIN DISORDERS AND CANCER |23 JUL 2018.

Scientists and clinicians from A*STAR’s Skin Research Institute of Singapore (SRIS), Institute of Medical Biology (IMB), Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS), Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN), and the National Skin Centre (NSC) are collaborating with C&C Research Laboratories, a leading research institute from the Republic of Korea (ROK), to develop innovative drugs. The collaboration aims to address diseases of significant clinical burden, namely inflammatory skin disorders and major cancers including colorectal and liver cancers, through R&D in areas such as cancer stem cell research. “This partnership with C&C is yet another example of how researchers and companies from Singapore and Korea can come together in a complementary way, to develop new drugs to address important medical problems. The focus on skin diseases is particularly strategic, as this represents a great unmet medical need for which there has been little innovation over the past decade,” said Dr Benjamin Seet, Executive Director of A*STAR’s Biomedical Research Council. The news was reported in Asian Scientist.

OLAY SCIENTISTS DISCOVERS THE POWER OF NIACINAMIDE FOR SKIN CARE |11 JUL 2018.

Olay has conducted three research studies, which collectively provide insights into specific skin mechanisms impacted by niacinamide. The findings showed that the ingredient enhances mitochondrial function in human skin fibroblast and keratinocytes; helps to fight the effects of oxidative stress on human skin keratinocytes, and can balance the key properties of human skin keratinocytes, including differentiation, proliferation, senescence, and stem cell properties. The research was conducted by Olay researchers in partnership with Newcastle University (UK) and A*STAR’s Institute of Medical Biology (IMB). The findings were presented at the International Investigative Dermatology annual meeting in May 2018. The news was reported in Cosmetic Design Asia.

SINGAPORE INSTITUTES COLLABORATE WITH ROK TO DEVELOP INNOVATIVE DRUGS |3 JUL 2018.

Scientists and clinicians from A*STAR’s Skin Research Institute of Singapore (SRIS), Institute of Medical Biology (IMB), Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS), Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN), and the National Skin Centre (NSC) are collaborating with C&C Research Laboratories, a leading research institute from the Republic of Korea (ROK), to develop innovative drugs. The collaboration aims to address diseases of significant clinical burden, namely inflammatory skin disorders and major cancers including colorectal and liver cancers, through R&D in areas such as cancer stem cell research. “This partnership with C&C is yet another example of how researchers and companies from Singapore and Korea can come together in a complementary way, to develop new drugs to address important medical problems. The focus on skin diseases is particularly strategic, as this represents a great unmet medical need for which there has been little innovation over the past decade,” said Dr Benjamin Seet, Executive Director of A*STAR’s Biomedical Research Council. The news was reported in Bio Spectrum Asia.

NEW DISCOVERY REVEALS ACNE, ACNE SCARRING MAY BE RELATED TO COLLAGEN ISSUES|16 JUN 2018.

Acne vulgaris (acne) is the most common skin disease in the world. In developed countries such as Singapore, it can affect up to 80-90% of adolescents. Usually, the disease goes away by itself. But for many patients, acne can persist into adulthood and leave disfiguring scars, estimated to affect up to 95% of patients. Professor Maurice Van Steensel and Dr Ivo De Vos, researchers from Agency for Science, Technology and Research’s (A*STAR) Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) in Singapore, together with colleagues from other institutes across Singapore, Europe and Australia, have discovered that acne, as well as the associated scarring, can result from connective tissue problems through an extremely rare skin disease called Winchester syndrome. They hope their discovery will pave the way for better acne treatments. Key to their findings is a protein called MMP14, an enzyme that can break down collagen, and a protein that not only makes up most of the connective tissue under the skin, but also ensures bones are strong. The news was reported in Biotech In Asia.

OLAY RESEARCH REVEALS EFFECTIVE PRO-AGE PROPERTIES OF NIACINAMIDE |7 JUN 2018.

Olay has conducted three research studies, which collectively provide insights into specific skin mechanisms impacted by niacinamide. The findings showed that the ingredient enhances mitochondrial function in human skin fibroblast and keratinocytes; helps to fight the effects of oxidative stress on human skin keratinocytes, and can balance the key properties of human skin keratinocytes, including differentiation, proliferation, senescence, and stem cell properties. The research was conducted by Olay researchers in partnership with Newcastle University (UK) and A*STAR’s Institute of Medical Biology (IMB). The findings were presented at the recent International Investigative Dermatology annual meeting. The news was reported in Cosmetics Design Europe.

NEW GENETIC FINDINGS EXPLAIN HOW EMBRYOS FORM ARMS AND LEGS |24 MAY 2018.

Researchers from Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) with collaboration of international group of clinicians and researchers from Turkey, France, Portugal and India have found that mutations in the RSPO2 gene lead to incomplete limb development. The team then studied mice lacking all three LGRs required for RSPO2’s function, and found that contrary to what was expected they still developed limbs and lungs normally. This indicates that RSPO2 does not need LGRs-disproving the established understanding of how this is happening. Together with collaborators in Belgium, the team went on to check this same pathway in frog models, and confirmed that the absence of RSPO2 prevents limb development. The news was reported in Info Surhoy & Medical Xpress.

NEW BRAIN DEVELOPMENT DISORDER IDENTIFIED BY SCIENTISTS |22 & 23 MAY 2018.

Researchers from Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) have identified a new inherited neurodevelopmental disease that causes slow growth, seizures and learning difficulties in humans. The team reveals that this disease is caused by a recessive mutation in CAMK2A - a gene that is well known for its role in regulating learning and memory in animals. The findings suggest that dysfunctional CAMK2 genes may contribute to other neurological disorders, such as epilepsy and autism, opening up potential new avenues for treating these conditions. The news was reported in Info Surhoy, Science Codex, News Medical Net, R&D Mag, Brink Wire, Medical Xpress, Genome Web, Technology Networks, Eureka Alert, Science Daily, Sci Cast.

KMC, MANIPULARY DOCTOR DISCOVERS NEW GENES THAT CAUSE ABNORMALITIES IN HUMAN LIMBS |18 MAY 2018.

Department of Medical Genetics at Kasturba Medical College, Manipal collaborated with A*STAR's Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) and Istanbul University, Turkey to discover a new gene as a cause of human limb abnormalities or tetra amelia syndrome. The Manipal team led by Dr Girish Katta, comprising Dr Anju Shukla and Dr Shalini S Nayak, along with the international teams found that mutations in RSPO2 gene as the cause of the condition. The team also identified a new neurodevelopmental disorder ‘Multiple mitochondrial dysfunction syndrome’ and a bone disease ‘Short rib thoracic dysplasia type 16’ and these are already catalogued in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). The news was reported in The Hindu, Deccan Herald.

KMC, MANIPAL DOCTORS DISCOVER NEW GENE CAUSING HUMAN LIMB ABNORMALITIES |17 MAY 2018.

Department of Medical Genetics at Kasturba Medical College, Manipal collaborated with A*STAR's Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) and Istanbul University, Turkey to discover a new gene as a cause of human limb abnormalities or tetra amelia syndrome. The Manipal team led by Dr Girish Katta, comprising Dr Anju Shukla and Dr Shalini S Nayak, along with the international teams found that mutations in RSPO2 gene as the cause of the condition. The team also identified a new neurodevelopmental disorder ‘Multiple mitochondrial dysfunction syndrome’ and a bone disease ‘Short rib thoracic dysplasia type 16’ and these are already catalogued in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). ). The news was reported in Times Of India, NYOOOZ.

BUTTERFLY CHILDREN |29 APR 2018.

Prof E. Birgitte Lane, former Executive Director at Institute of Medical Biology (IMB), A*STAR was featured in the Mandarin version of a documentary on Epidermolysis bullosa (EB), highlighting the importance of fundamental skin research in Singapore. EB is an inherited connective tissue disease that causes blisters in the skin and mucosal membranes. Prof Lane shared that currently there is no cure for the disease and her team is trying to discover a therapeutic approach.
Dr Lim Sai Kiang, Research Director at IMB explained that in EB patients, collagen 7 gene is missing. Therefore, the skin will get wounded over and over again. Eventually the cells become cancerous. Her research team is working on giving the patients collagen 7 so that their quality of life can be improved. Such research forms the basis of treatments for many other skin diseases afflicting patients. The news was reported in Channel 8.

SINGAPORE’S BUTTERFLY CHILDREN, BORN WITH ‘THE WORST DISEASE YOU’VE NEVER HEARD OF’|2 MAR 2018.

Prof E. Birgitte Lane, Executive Director at Institute of Medical Biology (IMB), A*STAR was featured in a documentary on Epidermolysis bullosa (EB), highlighting the importance of fundamental skin research in Singapore. EB is an inherited connective tissue disease that causes blisters in the skin and mucosal membranes. Prof Lane shared that currently there is no cure for the disease and her team is trying to discover a therapeutic approach.
Dr Lim Sai Kiang, Research Director at IMB explained that in EB patients, collagen 7 gene is missing. Therefore, the skin will get wounded over and over again. Eventually the cells become cancerous. Her research team is working on giving the patients collagen 7 so that their quality of life can be improved. Such research forms the basis of treatments for many other skin diseases afflicting patients. The news was reported in CNA Online.

BUTTERFLY CHILDREN|11 FEB 2018.

In this episode, Prof E. Birgitte Lane, Executive Director at Institute of Medical Biology (IMB), A*STAR was featured on the topic Epidermolysis bullosa (EB), highlighting the importance of fundamental Skin Research in Singapore. EB is an inherited connective tissue disease that causes blisters in the skin and mucosal membranes. Prof Lane shared that currently there is no cure for the disease and her team is trying to discover a therapeutic approach. Dr Lim Sai Kiang, Research Director at IMB explained that in EB patients, collagen 7 gene is missing. Therefore, the skin will get wounded over and over again. Eventually the cells become cancerous. Her research team is working on giving the patients collagen 7 so that their quality of life can be improved. Such research forms the basis of treatments for many other skin diseases afflicting patients.The news was reported in Channel News Asia, CNA Online.