Asian Skin Microbiome

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The skin microbiome maintains health and causes disease

Our skin is home to millions of microbes; fungi, bacteria, and viruses, known as the skin microbiome. Mostly harmless, these microbes are crucial to our skin and overall health. Any disruption may contribute to a range of disorders including dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, eczema, and psoriasis. Understanding our skin microbiome will enable better skin treatments and improve skin health.

Leaders in the Asian skin microbiome

The Asian Skin Microbiome Programme (ASMP) brings together scientists, industry partners, engineers, and clinicians to investigate the Asian skin microbiome. As most skin microbiome research has been on Caucasians in North America and Western Europe, the Asian skin microbiome is an important clinical and therapeutic opportunity.

Our mission is to develop a understanding of the Asian skin microbiome, enabling rational treatment design, improving quality of life in Asia, and providing a sustainable and globally-leading platform supporting quality research and development in Singapore.

Tools and technologies

We are building capabilities and resources to understand the skin microbiome’s function, leading a move from marker gene-based taxonomic studies into whole-metagenome analysis. We will be integrating metagenomes, metabolomes, and lipidomes to define host-microbiome interactions, metatranscriptomics to measure microbiome response to interventions, and strain-level analysis to better study fungal-bacterial-host interactions.

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Functional skin microbiome

We are defining skin microbiome function in healthy human skin, learning how perturbations alter skin homeostasis, investigating healthy cohorts with data on puberty, adult health, menopause, and in targeted interventions. The health focus is unique, drawing strength from analysis on multiple health dimensions.

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Skin microbiome model

We are building experimentally validated skin microbiome models with increasing levels of complexity to study ‘cause and consequence’ relationships between the host and the microbiome. Fully understanding this relationship in maintaining skin homeostasis, and to enable testing of varied intervention strategies is key to utilizing the human profioing data that we and others generate.

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Contact us

For more information on the Asian Skin Microbiome Programme, please contact Thomas Dawson, John Common or Niranjan Nagarajan (from GIS).