Metabolomics

Metabolomics refers to the global study of small organic molecules with a molecular weight of less than 1000 Da. At BTI, metabolomics is used to study metabolic behaviour related to cell growth, apoptosis and protein productivity. Initial exploration of the metabolome is carried out using ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS).

The resulting raw MS data is pre-processed and analysed with MetaSuite, an in-house developed software. Targeted profiling of shortlisted metabolites of interest is subsequently carried out via the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) approach. The resulting information contributes towards improvements in cell culture processes, through guiding the development of optimal culture media and the identification of new targets for cell line engineering.

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PEOPLE

Dr Ho Ying Swan

Dr. Ho Ying Swan

ho_ying_swan@bti.a-star.edu.sg
Principal Scientist

PhD in Chemical Engineering (2007), Imperial College, UK

Research Focus/Interests

  • Metabolomics/metabolite profiling of mammalian cell lines to further understanding of intracellular metabolic processes and their impact on recombinant protein production and quality
  • Application of metabolite profiling to identify candidate disease markers and to study aberrant metabolism under disease conditions
ho yin ying

Dr. Ho Yin Ying

ho_yin_ying@bti.a-star.edu.sg
Associate Staff Scientist

PhD in Plant Biochemistry (2018), The University of Melbourne, Australia

Research Focus/Interests

  • Advancing analytical tools for metabolite identification
  • Targeted and non-targeted metabolomics
  • Characterize cell- and animal-based models for drug development
Annie Soh (updated)

Dr. Annie Soh

annie_soh@bti.a-star.edu.sg
Project Scientist

PhD in Sustainable Earth (Interdisciplinary Graduate Program) (2020), Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Research Focus/Interests

  • Characterisation of lipids and metabolites for drug development
  • The advancement of metabolomics in toxicological studies and resource recovery